Friday, February 26, 2010

First Year, Second Quarter, End of Week 8

Statistics - We are deep into multiple regressions with quantitative variables, categorical variables and interaction terms. Two more homework assignments and a take-home final. Thank goodness for a good textbook, weekly homework to keep me on task, Dr. Bridget Freisthler offering stats support, and good ol' Yool, our TA, and his homework review in lab.

Intervention Research - a lit review and two designs (randomized control trial and quasi-experimental design) addressing relevant internal and external validity threats and some other stuff. I will get to writing this paper very soon. It is marinating in my head, sort of.

Policy - Two written assignments about a social problem (I chose the achievement gap and education reform) under my belt. Now I am looking forward to a policy analysis paper and preparing for a debate about the pros and cons of entitlement reform. In the debate we are to: define the problem, develop two macro questions, argue the position from a rational approach avoiding value statements, create a schematic diagram and make 30-40 year predictions.

My daughter (8 years old) wants to be on the swim team. I take her to classes on Tuesdays and Thursdays. It is cold outside but the water is warm. She looks so happy and confident in the water. It makes it so worth it to sit and shiver on the metal bleachers trying to study.

At work, a team of us submitted two federal proposals to develop multi-tiered school social work services at three elementary schools and two middle schools in South LA - two million dollars over three years and six school social workers. What a difference that will make.

Last Friday, I presented at a UCLA Resiliency Symposium about my experiences with universal screening and trauma-informed/trauma-specific evidence-based group interventions at South LA's Harmony ES. On the drive over, I wondered: Why do I get myself into these fixes? I was very intimidated by the line up of presenters (psychiatrists, researchers, clinical scholars, etc.). I made a valiant effort not to cry when talking about working with students and their parents - trying to offer alternatives to avoidant coping by facilitating their communication, attunement and connection. I got through it and received positive feedback from audience members and other presenters. A RAND researcher said my stories made him want to go back to school to become a school social worker! He was being nice I am sure, but I'll take it.

No wonder I need self-care. Things are scheduled - hair color, massages (yes, plural!), tennis on Tuesdays. I am also setting limits.

Good night, it's time for milk and girl scout cookies. Oh yea, my daughter sold 74 boxes and we're nearly done with deliveries. Whew. Thank you, Yesus.

No comments:

Post a Comment